Recession Proofing Your Career

By
John Peterson
I-LEAD Program Assistant

With fears of another recession on the horizon due to the outbreak of Covid-19, I thought it would be important to provide strategies to help people survive the turmoil. Whether you’re looking, just beginning, in the midst of your career, or aren’t sure what college or employment path to take, this article is for you.

Instead of focusing on careers that are recession proof, let’s focus on skills. The reason is because while college can be good for employment prospects, the skills you learn are the reason you get hired. Not every career requires you to go to college. Even if you don’t go to college, developing certain skills will put you at an advantage. What types of skills are recession proof? According to research, skills that fall into the category of cognitive and people/social tend to be the most recession proof. But what are cognitive and people/social skills? To define this, we’ll be using O*NET’s definitions. O*NET is a database containing descriptions for jobs, salary/wage averages, and definitions for skills. According to O*NET, cognitive abilities are, “Abilities that influence the acquisition and application of knowledge in problem solving.” These include skills like, deductive reasoning, mathematical reasoning, oral comprehension, and many others. People/social skills are “Developed capacities used to work with people to achieve goals.” Included are, coordination, instructing, negotiation, persuasion, service orientation, and social perceptiveness.

Why are these skills more recession proof? Cognitive skills generate new ideas. When faced with economic downturns, organizations need new ideas to turn themselves around. Companies or organizations doing the same thing as before will likely fall into bankruptcy. Individuals that contribute new and innovate ideas will be less susceptible to layoffs or termination should those occur. This is not a guarantee but if you get laid off, you’ll have an advantage in the labor market. During a recession you must continue to be a people person. Managing conflict is a highly valuable skill many employers seek in their employees. Additionally, being able to get a group of people to work together can be tough. By learning how to be in a leadership role, you can understand how to manage teams. The cooperation you create between people may save the organization.

What careers require cognitive or people/social skill? Generally, both sets of skills go together but sometimes certain professions focus on one set of skills over another. For example, careers that require cognitive abilities are statisticians, chemical engineers, and Clinical Data managers. Next, how do you develop these skills? College is straightforward because it’s a place you can develop these skills. What about after college, or trade school? Many workplaces offer trainings for you to develop your skills. You can find webinars online, colleges and programs may be willing to pay for the training. Sites like Skillshare or Udemy have online courses you can take.

Another way to self-improvement is to read books that build skills. Are you interested in learning more about leadership? There are plenty of books on leadership out there to choose from! If you find you don’t have time to read, then think about listening to an audiobook. Check your local library to see if you have access to online audio books. Many libraries utilize the Libby App (https://libbyapp.com/welcome).  Articles can also be a great way to learn about new trends for skill development. They may not be as detailed as a book, but they can provide a general direction for where you can start looking. Some organizations also provide free materials you can use to develop skills. There are numerous sources you can use to develop your skills. Don’t be afraid to look around to see what’s available.

Some professions have associations you can join that provide training seminars. These are great ways to expand your knowledge and to meet people. Association memberships on resumes can show employers that you are serious about your profession. If interested, association memberships is good for finding a mentor. Mentorships are a great way to improve one’s skills. Their experiences can provide valuable guidance towards your own skill development. If a situation at work arises, a mentor will be able to provide advice on how to handle it. Then you can actively apply the advice given and learn from first-hand experience. A mentor may also be able to recommend certain materials for you to read or trainings to attend. They can also help you network and make employment recommendations.

What if you’re unable to do any of the above things mentioned? Volunteering with a nonprofit is a great way to build your skills! From interacting with people to making spreadsheets nonprofits can give you valuable experience. Nonprofits will train you on how to perform the needed tasks or send you to a training. Be sure to talk to the volunteer coordinator at the nonprofit of your choice to see what opportunities are available to you. It may lead to a job offer.

Even if you do all of the above, you may still be laid off. If this happens there are a few steps you can take. First, look at your employee handbook to see what your organizations policy is for layoffs and severance. You may be able to get unemployment, payment for unused vacation/sick days and other benefits. If these things aren’t clear, be sure to sit down with HR and discuss what the procedure is. Talk with your boss about your concerns if a recession does occur. Discuss what your day to day tasks are and why you’re needed. If you are laid off, ask about future collaboration projects or consulting or part time options. Ask permission to use them as a reference while you look for another job.

Overall, there isn’t a full-proof way to make sure you’re not affected by a recession. No matter the number of skills you have, sometimes things will just be out of your hands. But developing your cognitive and social/people skills will improve your bounce back time. Use every resource that is available to you in the process. You’ll be a stronger candidate for positions and employed quicker than most people who haven’t developed their cognitive skills.

For further reading:

Skills you need:

https://www.skillsyouneed.com/general/employability-skills.html

Free online courses:

https://www.edx.org/

Maintaining Mental Health during COVID-19

By Michael Carroll, LLMSW

Edited by: David Garcia, LMSW

The world has changed suddenly for many people in the past weeks. Between schools being closed, the lack of supplies at the store, and financial uncertainty, it is enough to make anyone feel stressed. Add to that, we are inundated with prophetic news coverage estimating that we may be just at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. The fear can be paralyzing at times and no one goes untouched by this current crisis. It is important to recognize that stress does play a pivotal role in life. I doubt many people would go to work if the stress of having to pay bills was not something on their minds. This is an example of healthy stress. It is necessary for humans to complete tasks, especially ones that can be redundant in our everyday lives. These every day activities can become problematic when stress and worry consume too much of one’s thoughts. This is the place where stress can develop into symptoms of anxiety or panic. While everyone responds differently to stress and worry due to their chemical makeups, we are all feeling anxious due to the current health situation. There are some simple things everyone can do to ease their burden.

It is important to take a step back and gain healthy and realistic perspectives. Human beings have made it through similarly scary situations in recent history, ex. 9/11 and school shootings. At the time, things seemed dire, but people rallied together to overcome through these crises. Human beings are resilient and have weathered difficult events throughout time. Consider how you would reflect back on your life after the COVID-19 quarantine a year or two from now. Yes, things are uncertain now and no one knows how this will turn out but we will be stronger in the end. Many people are in the same situation, doing their best to keep themselves and their families safe. While no one can predict who is going to get the virus, there are some things everyone can do to be proactive about it. These include washing hands frequently, practicing social distancing, and being active. Staying home is extremely important especially if you are starting to feel sick. Above all else, everyone should take a moment to take a deep breath and remain calm. There is a pandemic, but most of us cannot stop it. However, we can take measures to ensure it does not spread. People need to continue to living their lives, even if it is six feet away from each other.

Outside of being proactive, a good self-care routine can help tremendously. Exercise can boost your mood, promote good mental health and going for a walk is a great way to break up your routine. Getting outside and appreciating nature can be a relaxing activity for many, provided people are practicing social distancing. Additionally, be mindful of your diet which can affect your mood. So eating well is extremely important and should include fruits and vegetables. Staying home can be a stressful activity, especially for a few weeks at a time. Keep in touch with friends and family through the phone or video calls can be a source of support. Staying in regular contact with loved ones can help people feel, connected, informed and reassured of the health status of their family members. Another thing that people should do is staying available and interactive with their immediate family or other housemates. Enjoy this time together at home. Together catch up on your favorite shows, play board games, and appreciate the time you get to spend with your household. Surely, everyone has wished they could had stayed home while they were getting ready for work in the morning. Take advantage of this break from work. Find something that takes everyone’s mind off of these troubling times.

 

Lastly, it is good to stay informed, but limiting exposure to the news can help one maintain their sanity and limit their anxiety. This is not to say ignore the coverage completely, as public health announcements can be beneficial or lifesaving. Be mindful about how the news is affecting your mood or the moods of others and focus attention elsewhere if it becomes overwhelming. Take time to do those activities that are pleasurable or relaxing.

It can be intimidating to talk to children and teens about this health crisis. Their world has been equally affected and disrupted. Schools are out with some question about whether they will begin again this school year. When you talk with them, talk to them at a level they will understand, have actual facts and listen to what they say and how they say it. Ask how they are feeling and emphasize that it is okay to feel upset, anxious, depressed or afraid. Be ready to share your own feelings. Help them understand that the orders to stay home are to keep everyone safe, it’s not a punishment. Remember, moods can be contagious. If a parent is calm, that will reverberate throughout the home and it can be reassuring to kids.

Uncertainty can be scary during this time. Use techniques such as taking some deep breaths when feeling stressed or burned out. There is a breathing exercise called 4-4 breathing. Slowly inhale while counting to four and exhale while counting to four. Doing this a few times while concentrating on your breath can help one stay in the moment and relax. When you are washing your hands, staying home, etc…, think of the fact that you are doing the utmost possible that you can, to help yourself and your immediate household be safe and healthy. The world will continue to turn despite this pandemic. While this specific event is new to mankind, crises and epidemics are not. I have faith that humanity will make it through this pandemic. In the meanwhile, remember to be compassionate towards others. Keep calm, wash your handsfrequently and practice social distancing. As the band, The Police said, “Don’t stand, don’t stand so, don’t stand so close to me”.

Miigwetch,